Loading...

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Today in Media History: Coverage of 1986 space shuttle Challenger explosion

Today in Media History: Coverage of 1986 space shuttle Challenger explosion

Today in Labor History

American Miners’ Association formed - 1861
First U.S. unemployment compensation law enacted, in Wisconsin - 1932

The newest issue of the Graphic Communications Conference publication, the Graphic Communicator, contains articles about the mid-term elections, retirements of some GCC leaders and organizers, and the widening income gap between corporate CEOs and working families.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Time Capsule Dating to 1795 Included Coins, Newspapers

Early residents of Boston valued a robust press as much as their history and currency if the contents of a time capsule dating back to the years just after the Revolutionary War are any guide. When conservators at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston gingerly removed items from the box Tuesday, they found five tightly folded newspapers, a medal depicting George Washington, a silver plaque, two dozen coins, including one dating to 1655, and the seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. While some of the coins appeared corroded, other items were in good condition and fingerprints could be seen on the silver plaque.





Police in Farmington are looking for a woman who's been caught on camera several times stealing stacks of newspapers. No one knows her motive, but some are speculating if she's after the Sunday coupons.


Village Voice parent company will explore sale of papers

Village Voice parent company will explore sale of papers

Santa Fe, NM – January 27, 2015 – Voice Media Group has engaged Dirks, Van Essen & Murray and its subsidiary CAL DVM to explore new strategies for its publishing assets, including the sale or acquisition of alternative publications and other digital businesses.

Quick summary of the Southern California media landscape

Los Angeles Times: relatively stable, if you can believe it.
Orange County Register and Riverside News Press: Deep financial do-do; currently being sued by Los Angeles Times for unpaid bills
Los Angeles Newspaper Group: Up for sale either with all of Digital First Media or as a spinoff
Ventura County Star: Unclear what is happening with Scripps Media and the newspaper spinoff.


h/t Brett Levy

Today in Media History: The Western Union telegram ends and Twitter begins | Poynter.

Today in Media History: The Western Union telegram ends and Twitter begins | Poynter.

Tuesday Morning in the Blogosphere

Los Angeles City Hall



Media = content + people - Jeff Jarvis

Studs Terkel Awards ‘celebrate good journalism’ - Robert Feder

The Fix’s 2015 list of best state political reporters - The Washington Post

First female Editor in Chief of The Economist appointed - Editors Weblog

Jim Moroney’s digital-reaching Dallas Morning News - Capital New York

Who Wants to Buy OC Weekly? 'Cause We're For Sale! - Gustavo Arellano

Equity Firms May Soon Purchase Big Bay Area Newspapers - NBC Bay Area

4 reasons the New York Times Company won’t be sold anytime soon - Poynter

Why media companies get away with paying journalists so little - Simon Owens

Chattanooga Times announces bonuses and layoffs on the same day - Romenesko

Layoffs hit the Mobile Press-Register and the Birmingham News

Layoffs hit the Mobile Press-Register and the Birmingham News

OC Weekly has been put up for sale - LA Observed

OC Weekly has been put up for sale - LA Observed


Today in Labor History

New York City maids organize to improve working conditions - 1734
Mine explosion in Mount Pleasant, Pa., leaves more than 100 dead - 1891
First meeting of the Int’l Labor Organization (ILO) - 1920

Kansas miners strike against compulsory arbitration - 1920
2015.01.26history-power.in.unionA 3¢ postage stamp is issued, honoring AFL founder Samuel Gompers - 1950
(There is Power in a Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America is the sympathetic, thoughtful and highly readable history of the American labor movement traces unionism from the textile mills of Lowell, Massachusetts in the 1820s to organized labor’s decline in the 1980s and struggle for survival and growth today.)
A group of Detroit African-American auto workers known as the Eldon Avenue Axle Plant Revolutionary Union Movement leads a wildcat strike against racism and bad working conditions. They are critical of both automakers and the UAW, condemning the seniority system and grievance procedures as racist – 1969
Pete Seeger dies in New York at age 94. A musician and activist, he was a revered figure on the American2015.01.26history-seegerleft, persecuted during the McCarthy era for his support of progressive, labor and civil rights causes. A prolific songwriter, he is generally credited with popularizing the civil rights anthem “We Shall Overcome.” He actively participated in demonstrations until shortly before his death - 2014
Members of the Northwestern University football team announce they are seeking union recognition. A majority signed cards, later delivered to the National Labor Relations Board office in Chicago, asking for representation by the College Athletes Players Association - 2014

Monday, January 26, 2015

News VP for Lee Enterprises will step down | Poynter.

News VP for Lee Enterprises will step down | Poynter.

Printing a Newspaper

Recorded Christmas Eve 2012 on an iPhone 5 at the plant that prints the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News. Slapped some clips together with iMovie.


Former Fox employee kills himself outside of News Corp building | Poynter.

Former Fox employee kills himself outside of News Corp building | Poynter.

Monday Morning in the Blogosphere

Just missed the Red Line last week


Jill Leovy’s ‘Ghettoside’ - New York Times

Only in LA: The great ideas issue - LAObserved

Interview with New York Times Editor Baquet - Spiegel

Sports Illustrated lays off all staff photographers - NPPA

Postmedia and the heavy price it pays to survive - The Star

N.Y. private-equity firm in talks for Mercury News owner - SF Gate

Cerberus, Apollo bidding for Digital First Media - Capital New York

Former employee of Austin’s Fox affiliate kills himself - Romenesko

OC Register Blasphemously Subscription Deal for Catholics - Gustavo Arellano

What A Scoop! Settlers of Catan Publisher Making Newspaper Game - The Escapist

Today in Labor History

2015.01.26history-henry.morgan-workers.compJanuary 26
In what could be considered the first workers’ compensation agreement in America, pirate Henry Morgan pledges his underlings 600 pieces of eight or six slaves to compensate for a lost arm or leg. Also part of the pirate’s code, reports Roger Newell: shares of the booty were equal regardless of race or sex, and shipboard decisions were made collectively - 1695
Samuel Gompers, first AFL president, born in London, England. He emigrated to the U.S. as a youth - 1850
The Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America is chartered by the American Federation of Labor to organize "every wage earner from the man who takes the bullock at the house until it goes into the hands of the consumer." - 1897
Workers win a two-day sit-down strike at the Brooklyn electric plant that powers the city's entire subway system - 1937
A handful of American companies announce nearly 60,000 layoffs today, as the recession that began during the George W. Bush presidency charges full-tilt toward what became known as the Great Recession - 2009
(Union Strategies for Hard Times, 2nd Edition: What can unions do as the fallout of the 2015.01.26history-hard.timesGreat Recession continues to ravage workers and their unions and threatens to destroy decades of collective bargaining gains? What must local union leaders do to help their laid off members, protect those still working, and prevent the gutting of their hard-fought contracts—and their very unions themselves? 
     Bill Barry, until recently director of labor studies at the Community College of Baltimore County and a 40-year veteran of the movement, calls on his long history of activism and years of "what works, what doesn’t" discussions with other leaders to come up with a plan to survive these terrible times and even use crisis to build a better future.)

Today in Media History: Lotus 1-2-3 was the killer app of 1983 | Poynter.

Today in Media History: Lotus 1-2-3 was the killer app of 1983 | Poynter.

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Today in Labor History

Indian field hands at San Juan Capistrano mission refused to work, engaging in what was probably the first farm worker strike in California - 18262015.01.19history-farmworker.friend
(Farmworker’s Friend: The story of Cesar Chavez is a thoughtful and moving book about the inspiring life of American hero Cesar Chavez, founder and long-time leader of the United Farm Workers of America. This sympathetic portrayal of Chavez and his life’s work begins with his childhood, starting from the time his family’s store in Arizona failed during the Great Depression and his entire family was forced into the fields to harvest vegetables for a few cents an hour. It traces his growth as a man and as a leader, talking of his pacifism, his courage in the face of great threats and greater odds, his leadership and his view that the union was more than just a union, it was a community—una causa.)
Birth of Terence V. Powderly, leader of the Knights of Labor - 1849
The United Mine Workers of America is founded in Columbus, Ohio, with the merger of the Knights of Labor Trade Assembly No. 135 and the National Progressive Miners Union - 1890
Five hundred New York City tenants battle police to prevent evictions - 1932

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Social media editor leaves LA Times for RYOT News - LA Observed

Social media editor leaves LA Times for RYOT News - LA Observed

Sowing Seeds For Life Open today 11am - 4pm

The food pantry is open today with new hours of operation, we're now open from 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM, so come by and visit as we fill your home with food, As the visitors have increased it has caused a traffic nightmare on Arrow Highway, to alleviate the traffic problem we began opening two hours early, serving the needy already in line.

Sowing Seeds For Life
1350 Arrow Highway
La Verne, CA. 91750

Located between San Dimas Canyon Road and Wheeler.


Today in Labor History

Some 750,000 steel workers walk out in 30 states, largest strike in U.S. history to that time - 1946
Postal workers begin four-day strike at the Jersey City, N.J., bulk and foreign mail center, protesting an involuntary shift change. The wildcat was led by a group of young workers who identified themselves as “The Outlaws”- 1974
Six hundred police attack picketing longshoremen in Charleston, S.C. - 2000

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

The forces that are anti-Negro are by and large anti-labor - Martin Luther King Jr.

"The forces that are anti-Negro are by and large anti-labor, and with the coming together of the powerful influence of labor and all people of goodwill in the struggle for freedom and human dignity, I can assure you that we have a powerful instrument."

- Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., addressing the United Packinghouse Workers Union (UPWU) in 1962



Huntington curator on 'The Bard of LA' - LA Observed

Huntington curator on 'The Bard of LA' - LA Observed

Tuesday Night in the Blogosphere

The Gas Company Building, Los Angeles, CA. 



Gaming Journalism - Editors Weblog

Tribune Publishing CFO stepping down - Chicago Tribune

Gannett to close printing plant in St. Louis - SL Business Journal

Why U-T ran Charlie Hebdo cartoons - San Diego Union Tribune

How Your Facebook Likes Could Cost You a Job - New York Times

A deal so good that U-T San Diego doesn't want you sharing it - Romenesko

GCHQ captured emails of journalists from top international media - Guardian

Iranian paper banned for showing Clooney wearing "Je suis Charlie" pin - Reuters

Mara Shalhoup leaving the Reader to become editor of LA Weekly - Chicago Reader

Amid outcry, News-Press is adamant on provocative term for immigrants - LA Times

Today in Media History: Iran releases American hostages in 1981 | Poynter.

Today in Media History: Iran releases American hostages in 1981 | Poynter.

Today in Labor History

Chicago Crib Disaster—A fire breaks out during construction of a water tunnel for the city of Chicago, burning the wooden dormitory housing the tunnel workers. While 46 survive the fire by jumping into the frigid lake and climbing onto ice floes, approximately 60 men die, 29 burned beyond recognition and the others drowned - 1909
American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) founded – 1920
The Nazis adopt the “Act on the Regulation of National Labor,” replacing independently negotiated collective agreements. The act read, in part, “The leader of the plant makes the decisions for the employees and laborers in all matters concerning the2015.01.19history-mickey.mantleenterprise... He is responsible for the well-being of the employees and laborers. [They] owe him faithfulness.” - 1934
Hardworking Mickey Mantle signs a new contract with the New York Yankees making him the highest paid player in baseball: $75,000 for the entire 1961 season - 1961
Bruce Springsteen's "My Hometown," a eulogy for dying industrial cities, is the country’s most listened-to song. The lyrics, in part: "Now Main Street's whitewashed windows and vacant stores / Seems like there ain't nobody wants to come down here no more / They're closing down the textile mill across the railroad tracks / Foreman says these jobs are going boys and they ain't coming back to your hometown / Your hometown / Your hometown / Your hometown..." - 1986

Monday, January 19, 2015

This is Hilarious

When Martin Luther King spoke in Los Angeles - LA Observed

When Martin Luther King spoke in Los Angeles - LA Observed

Today in Media History: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the news stories from Selma | Poynter.

Today in Media History: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the news stories from Selma | Poynter.

Today in Labor History

2015.01.19history-strikes.world
Twenty strikers at the American Agricultural Chemical Co. in Roosevelt, N.J., were shot, two fatally, by factory guards. They and other strikers had stopped an incoming train in search of scabs when the guards opened fire - 1915
(Strikes Around the World draws on the experience of fifteen countries—The United States, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, Argentina, Korea, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Covering the high and low points of strike activity over the period 1968–2005, the study shows continuing evidence of the durability, adaptability and necessity of the strike.)
Some 3,000 members of the Filipino Federation of Labor strike the plantations of Oahu, Hawaii. Their ranks swell to 8,300 as they are joined by members of the Japanese Federation of Labor - 1920
Yuba City, Calif., labor contractor Juan V. Corona found guilty of murdering 25 itinerant farm workers he employed during 1970 and 1971 - 1973
Bruce Springsteen makes an unannounced appearance at a benefit for laid-off 3M workers, Asbury Park, N.J. - 1986

In Celebration of the life of Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American pastor, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement ofcivil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs.
He was born Michael King, but his father changed his name in honor of the German reformer Martin Luther. A Baptist minister, King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia, in 1962, and organized nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama, that attracted national attention following television news coverage of the brutal police response. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history.
On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1965, he and the SCLC helped to organize the Selma to Montgomery marches and the following year, he took the movement north to Chicago to work on segregated housing. In the final years of his life, King expanded his focus to include poverty and speak against the Vietnam War, alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled "Beyond Vietnam".
In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People's Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. His death was followed by riots in many U.S. cities. Allegations that James Earl Ray, the man convicted of killing King, had been framed or acted in concert with government agents persisted for decades after the shooting. The jury of a 1999 civil trial found Loyd Jowers to be complicit in a conspiracy against King. The ruling has since been discredited and a sister of Jowers admitted that he had fabricated the story so he could make $300,000 from selling the story, and she in turn corroborated his story in order to get some money to pay her income tax.[1][2]
King was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold MedalMartin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a holiday in numerous cities and states beginning in 1971, and as aU.S. federal holiday in 1986. Hundreds of streets in the U.S. have been renamed in his honor. In addition, a county was rededicated in his honor. A memorial statue on the National Mall was opened to the public in 2011.


Martin Luther King - I Have A Dream Speech - August 28, 1963