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Tuesday, September 02, 2014

Today in Labor History

White and Chinese immigrants battle in Rock Springs, Wyo., fueled by racial tensions and the practice of Union Pacific Railroad of hiring lower-paid Chinese over whites. At least 25 Chinese died and 15 more were injured. Rioters burned 75 Chinese homes – 2014.09.01history-chix.feathers.bookcover1885
(Chicken Feathers and Garlic Skin: Diary of a Chinese Garment Factory Girl on Saipan: We’ve all read newspaper and magazine reports about how miserable life is for garment workers in Third World sweatshops. But we’ve read very little in the workers’ own words, and that’s what this fascinating book offers. In Chicken Feathers and Garlic Skin, 25-year-old Chun Yu Wang tells of her life as a Chinese emigrant to Saipan, searching for a better life 2,000 miles from her home.)
Operating railway employees win 8-hour day - 1916
Mineowners bomb West Virginia strikers by plane, using homemade bombs filled with nails and metal fragments. The bombs missed their targets or failed to explode - 1921
President Eisenhower signs legislation expanding Social Security by providing much wider coverage and including 10 million additional Americans, most of them self-employed farmers, with additional benefits - 1954
2014.09.01history-retire.happy.bookcoverThe Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) was signed by President Ford, regulating and insuring pensions and other benefits, and increasing protections for workers – 1974
(Retire Happy: What To Do NOW to Guarantee A Great Retirement: Everyone who works for a living thinks at some point about retirement, but few actually consider what that really means, other than escaping the daily grind. For sure, most of us worry about having enough money, and this highly readable book provides a lot of information and advice on the subject: how much we’ll need, how to make the most of what we’ve accumulated, how to accumulate more (even as we get close to retirement) and how to make it last. For that advice alone, Retire Happy is worth the price.)
September 01
The Int’l Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers is founded at a meeting in Chicago, the product of two separate brotherhoods created over the previous 13 years - 18932014.09.01history-weekend.bookcover
Congress declares Labor Day a national holiday – 1894
(From the Folks Who Brought You The Weekend is a sweeping, highly readable history of U.S. labor that will be welcomed by anyone interested in learning more about the struggle of American working people to better their lives through collective action.)
Some 30,000 women from 26 trades marched in Chicago's Labor Day parade - 1903
Walter Reuther is born. He went on to become a founder of the United Auto Workers and was president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations when it merged with the AFL in 1955 - 1907
A 3-week strike in Woonsocket, R.I., part of a national movement to obtain a minimum wage for textile workers, resulted in the deaths of three workers. Ultimately more than 420,000 workers struck nationally - 19342014.09.01history-Hawaiian-sugar-strike
In Hawaii, some 26,000 sugar workers represented by the Longshoremen’s union begin what is to become a successful 79-day strike that shuts down 33 of the 34 sugar plantations on the islands. The strike brought an end to Hawaii's paternalistic labor relations and impacted political and social institutions throughout the then-territory - 1946
Int'l Metal Engravers & Marking Device Workers Union changed its name to Int’l Association of Machinists - 1956
Some 20,000 Pennsylvania Railroad shop workers effectively halt operations in 13 states for 12 days. It was the first shutdown in the company's 114-year history - 1960
Boot Shoe Workers' Union merged with Retail Clerks Int’l Union - 1977
The Journeymen Barbers, Hairdressers and Cosmetologists' Int'l Union of America merged with United Food & Commercial Workers - 1980
Glass Bottle Blowers' Association of the United States & Canada merged with Int'l Brotherhood of Pottery & Allied Workers to become Glass, Pottery, Plastics & Allied Workers - 1982
2014.09.01history-mergersAluminum, Brick & Clay Workers Int'l Union merged with United Glass & Ceramic Workers of North America to form Int'l Union of Aluminum, Brick & Glass Workers - 1982
Brotherhood of Railway, Airline & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express & Station Employees changed name to Transportation-Communications Union - 1987
Coopers Int’l Union of North America merged with Glass, Molders, Pottery, Plastics & Allied Workers Int'l Union - 1992
The federal minimum wage is increased to $5.15 per hour - 1997
The AFL-CIO creates Working America, a nonpartisan, non-profit organization designed to build alliances among non-union working people - 2003

LAT's Robert J. Lopez leaves for communications job at Cal State LA - LA Observed

LAT's Robert J. Lopez leaves for communications job at Cal State LA - LA Observed


Journalist Steven Sotloff reportedly executed by ISIS

Journalist Steven Sotloff reportedly executed by ISIS

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Today in Labor History

Delegates from several East Coast cities meet in convention to form the National Trades' Union, uniting craft unions to oppose "the most unequal and unjustifiable distribution of the wealth of society in the hands of a few individuals."  The union faded after a few years - 1834
President Franklin Roosevelt's Wealth Tax Act increases taxes on rich citizens and big business, lowers taxes for small businesses - 1935
OSHA publishes scaffold safety standard, designed to protect 2.3 million construction workers and prevent 50 deaths and 4,500 injuries annually - 1996

Overworked and overwhelmed? Consider these 7 questions

Overworked and overwhelmed? Consider these 7 questions

Friday, August 29, 2014

Today in Labor History

Seventy-five workers die when the lower St. Lawrence River’s Quebec Bridge collapses while under construction.  A flawed design was found to be the cause.  Thirteen more workers were killed nine years later when the reconstructed bridge’s central span was being raised and fell into the river because of a problem with hoisting devices - 1907
Dancers at San Francisco’s Lusty Lady Club vote 57-15 to be represented by SEIU Local 790. Their first union contract, ratified eight months later, guaranteed work shifts, protection against arbitrary discipline and termination, automatic hourly wage increases, sick days, a grievance procedure, and removal of one-way mirrors from peep show booths - 19962014.08.25history-northwest.pilots
Northwest Airlines pilots, after years of concessions to help the airline, begin what is to become a 2-week strike for higher pay - 1998
Delegates to the  Minnesota AFL-CIO convention approve the launching of workdayminnesota.org, now in its fourteenth year.  It was the first web-based daily labor news service by a state labor federation - 2000
2014.08.25history-mlk.marchAugust 28
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom—the Martin Luther King Jr. "I Have A Dream" speech march—is held in Washington, D.C., with 250,000 participating.  The AFL-CIO did not endorse the march, but several affiliated unions did – 1963
(Martin Luther King, Jr., and the March on Washington: Written for 5 to 8 year-olds, this is a very nice introduction to Martin Luther King, Jr., and the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, that watershed event in the fight for civil rights. It uses the March as a point of reference as it talks about segregation in America and the battle for equal rights.)

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Today in Labor History

Some 14,000 Chicago teachers who have gone without pay for several months finally collect about $1,400 each - 1934
President Truman orders the U.S. Army to seize all the nation's railroads to prevent a general strike.  The railroads were not returned to their owners until two years later - 1950
"The cost of liberty is less than the price of repression."
In memory, W.E.B Dubois (Feb. 23, 1868 – Aug. 27, 1963), sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author and editor. Photo: Du Bois with Mary McLeod Bethune and Horace Mann Bond, undated from U. Mass-Amherst. See more: http://bit.ly/SHaCSr

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

New local news editors named at the LA Times - LA Observed

New local news editors named at the LA Times - LA Observed

Advice Goddess Blog

Advice Goddess Blog - "TV Producer In Beverly Hills For Pre-Emmys Event Arrested For Being Tall, Bald And Black"

Tuesday Morning in the Blogosphere

William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, the creators of the Cartoon The Jetsons, prediction of 
how newspapers would be read in the future were exactly on the mark



Stick a Fork in Your Newspaper - Bloomberg View

Ad revenue forecast to set record next year - Crain's

UH student paper shifts to weekly print publication - Chron

The Fall and Rise of Investigative Journalism - Huffington Post

Rupert Murdoch runs News Corp along 'feudal' lines - The Guardian

The Financial Times' mobile-led weekend evolution - Editors Weblog

Jonesboro Police Chief resigns after attacking reporter online - Romenesko

Declining circulation is a term that haunts editors and publishers - Grubstreet

LITTLE: Newspapers are still here, still making money - Grand Haven Tribune

Newspapers appear to be deemphasizing single copy sales - Talking New Media

Turner rumored to be offering buyouts to 550 employees

Turner rumored to be offering buyouts to 550 employees

Today in Labor History

Fannie Sellins and Joseph Starzeleski are murdered by coal company guards on a picket line in Brackenridge, Pa. Sellins was a United Mine Workers of America organizer and Starzeleski was a miner - 1919

After three-quarters of the states had ratified the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, women win their long struggle for the vote - 1920
With America in the depths of the Great Depression, the Comptroller of the Currency announces a temporary halt on foreclosures of first mortgages - 1932
In what some may consider one of the many management decisions that was to help cripple the American auto industry over the following decades, Ford Motor Co. produces its first Edsel. Ford dropped the project two years later after losing approximately $350 million - 19572014.08.25history-womens.strike.equality
The Women’s Strike for Equality is staged in cities across the U.S., marking the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment, under which women won the right to vote.  A key focus of the strike—in fact, more accurately a series of marches and demonstrations—was equality in the workplace.  An estimated 20,000 women participated, some carrying signs with the iconic slogan, “Don’t Iron While the Strike is Hot.”  Another sign: “Hardhats for Soft Broads” - 1970
More than 1,300 bus drivers on Oahu, Hawaii, begin what is to become a 5-week strike - 2003

Today the Jackie Robinson West All Stars have made history

Well the fellows came up short in the championship game but they are still Americans little league champions! Give these young men a thumbs up ladies and gentlemen, Americans 2014 little league world series Champion’s! - Haywood Galbreath
"Today the Jackie Robinson West All Stars have made history as only the third team ever from Illinois to reach the championship game of the Little League World Series and the City of Chicago could not be prouder of them. Their positive attitude and success on the field has rallied people from every neighborhood to support these kids and they continue to demonstrate why they are the pride of Chicago. What a comeback. What a win!" - Mayor Emanuel


Monday, August 25, 2014

American journalist released in Syria; British officials ID man believed to be Foley’s killer

American journalist released in Syria; British officials ID man believed to be Foley’s killer

Today in Labor History

Birth of Allan Pinkerton, whose strike-breaking detectives ("Pinks") gave us the word "fink" - 1819
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters founded at a meeting in New York City.  A. Philip Randolph became the union's first organizer - 1925