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Thursday, December 18, 2014

Today in Labor History

December 18  --  Union Communications Services, Inc.

General Motors announces it is closing 21 North American plants over the following four years and slashing tens of thousands of jobs - 1991

December 17
Int’l Union of Aluminum, Brick & Glass Workers merges with United Steelworkers of America - 1996

December 16 
The National Civic Federation is formed by business and labor leaders, most prominently AFL president Sam Gompers, as a vehicle to resolve conflicts between management and labor. Not all unionists agreed with the alliance. The group turned increasingly conservative and labor withdrew after Gompers’ 1924 death - 1900
2014.12.15history-majesticNew York City’s Majestic Theater becomes first in the U.S. to employ women ushers - 1902
The Bagel Bakers of America union is continuing a work slowdown at 32 of New York’s 34 bagel bakeries in a dispute over health and welfare fund payments and workplace sanitation, the New York Timesreports. Coincidentally—or not—lox sales were down 30 percent to 50 percent as well. The effect on the cream cheese market was not reported - 1951
Four railway unions merge to become the United Transportation Union: Trainmen, Firemen & Enginemen, Switchmen, and Conductors and Brakemen - 1968
Eight female bank tellers in Willmar, Minn., begin the first strike against a bank in U.S. history. At issue: they were paid little more than half what male tellers were paid. The strike ended in moral victory but economic defeat two years later - 1977
(United Apart: Gender and the Rise of Craft Unionism: At the turn of the twentieth century, American 2014.12.15history-united.apartfactory workers were often segregated by sex—males did heavier, dirtier, and better paid, work while women might be employed in a separate area performing related, lighter work. Men might cut bolts of fabric, for example, while women stitched cuffs onto sleeves. How this division of labor played out when an occupational group comprised of one sex went on strike is the subject of this book.)

Monday, December 15, 2014

Can Sony stop news organizations from publishing?

Can Sony stop news organizations from publishing?

Today in Labor History

AFL convention passes a 1¢ per capita assessment to aid the organization of women workers (Exact date uncertain) - 1913
2014.12.15history-amazon.armyThe Kansas National Guard is called out to subdue from 2,000 to 6,000 protesting women who were going from mine to mine attacking non-striking miners in the Pittsburgh coal fields. The women made headlines across the state and the nation: they were christened the "Amazon Army" by the New York Times - 1921
Eight days after the attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor, the AFL pledges that there will be no strikes in defense-related plants for the duration of World War II - 1941
Meeting in its biennial convention, the AFL-CIO declares “unstinting support” for “measures the Administration might deem necessary to halt Communist aggression and secure a just and lasting peace” in Vietnam - 1967
The U.S. Age Discrimination in Employment Act becomes law. It bars employment discrimination against anyone aged 40 or older - 19672014.12.15history-fed.emp.laws
(The Essential Guide To Federal Employment Laws, 4th edition: This is a well-indexed book, updated in 2013, offering the full text of 20 federal laws affecting workers’ lives, along with plain-English explanations of each. An entire chapter is devoted to each law, explaining what is allowed and prohibited and what businesses must comply.)
California's longest nurses’ strike ended after workers at Doctors Medical Center in San Pablo and Pinole approved a new contract with Tenet Healthcare Corp., ending a 13-month walkout - 2003
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers union organizer Clinton Jencks, who led New Mexico zinc miners in the strike depicted in the classic 1954 movie Salt of the Earth, dies of natural causes in San Diego at age 87 - 2005

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Pulitzer-prize winning photographer Michel du Cille has died

Pulitzer-prize winning photographer Michel du Cille has died


Thursday Morning in the Blogosphere

At the Los Angeles Times Pressmen's breakfast last week, retirees 
(L) John Gaglio and Nash Burru



Old newspapers provide history lesson - Houma Courier

Rich Mirman named publisher of The Press-Enterprise - PE

How Much Google News Traffic Do Publishers Get? - Adam Sherk

Congressional leaders hammer out deal to cut retiree benefits - WaPo

Journalism's eternal search for the outside savior - Los Angeles Times

Goal for Old Newsboys remains the same since the 1930s - Syracuse.com

Six tech trends that are set to change news media in 2015 - Editors Weblog

Judge tosses $111 million verdict against Zell company - Chicago Business

Stephen Battaglio leaves TV Guide for the Los Angeles Times - Romenesko

Walmart Illegally Threatened Workers Trying to Unionize - Capital and Main


Capital flows like water to media companies (of a certain kind)

Capital flows like water to media companies (of a certain kind)

Busy with the food banks






Just incase your wondering where I've been, moving food seven days per week. Our other truck driver suffered a heart attack and I'm taking up the slack.

Today in Labor History

December 11 2014.12.08history-colored-farmers-alliance
A small group of black farmers organize the Colored Farmers’ National Alliance and Cooperative Union in Houston County, Texas. They had been barred from membership in the all-white Southern Farmers’ Alliance. Through intensive organizing, along with merging with another black farmers group, the renamed Colored Alliance by 1891 claimed a membership of 1.2 million - 1886
(On the Global Waterfront: The Fight to Free the Charleston 5: Read this story about “the movers and shakers versus the moved and shaken”—longshoremen in South Carolina who confronted attempts to wipe out their union, the state’s most powerful black organization, and rallied the nation and labor around the world in their successful fight.)
Ten days after an Illinois State mine inspector approved coal dust removal techniques at New Orient mine in West Frankfort, the mine exploded, largely because of coal dust accumulations, killing 119 workers - 1951
The U.S. Department of Labor announces that the nation's unemployment rate had dropped to 3.3 percent, the lowest mark in 15 years - 1968
2014.12.08history-london-ontrario-strikersForty thousand workers go on general strike in London, Ontario—a city with a population of 300,000—protesting cuts in social services - 1995
Michigan becomes the 24th state to Adopt right-to-work legislation. The Republican-dominated state Senate introduced two measures—one covering private workers, the other covering public workers—by surprise five days earlier and immediately voted their passage; the Republican House approved them five days later (the fastest it legally could) and the Republican governor immediately signed both bills - 2012
2014.12.08history-no.contract.no.peaceDecember 10 
First sit-down strike in U.S. called by IWW at General Electric in Schenectady, N.Y. - 1906
(No Contract, No Peace: A Legal Guide to Contract Campaigns, Strikes, and Lockouts is a must-have for any union or activist considering aggressive action to combat management’s growing economic war against workers. No Contract, No Peace! updates information contained in the first edition, entitled Strikes, Picketing and Inside Campaigns, to include reference to recent union activities and NLRB decisions that have affected the labor relations environment. Schwartz’s familiarity with labor and employment law combines with his activist spirit to provide innovative yet practical tips for mounting and maintaining meaningful campaigns designed to build union and workers’ power.)
Int’l Human Rights Day, commemorating the signing at the United Nations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states, in part: “Everyone has the right to form and join trade unions for the protection of his interests.” - 1948
American Federation of Teachers Local 89 in Atlanta, Georgia, disaffiliates from the national union because of an AFT directive that all its locals integrate. A year later, the AFT expelled all locals that refused to do so - 1956
December 09
Ratification of a new labor agreement at Titan Tire of Natchez, Miss., ends the longest strike in the history of the U.S. tire industry, which began May 1, 1998, at the company's Des Moines, Iowa, plant - 2001
December 08
Twenty-five unions found the American Federation of Labor (AFL) in Columbus, Ohio; Cigarmaker’s union leader Samuel 2014.12.08history-power.in.a.unionGompers is elected president. The AFL’s founding document’s preamble reads: “A struggle is going on in all of the civilized world between oppressors and oppressed of all countries, between capitalist and laborer...” – 1886
(There is Power in a Union: The Epic Story of Labor in America: This thoughtful and highly readable history of the American labor movement traces unionism from the textile mills of Lowell, Massachusetts in the 1820s to organized labor’s decline in the 1980s and struggle for survival and growth today. Illustrated with dozens of photos, posters and more.)
114-day newspaper strike begins, New York City - 1962
President Bill Clinton signs The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) - 1993
Nearly 230 jailed teachers—about one-fourth of the 1,000-member Middletown Township, N.J., staff—are ordered freed after they and their colleagues agree to end a 9-day strike and go into mediation with the local school board - 2001
Faced with a national unemployment rate of 10 percent, President Barack Obama outlines new multibillion-dollar stimulus and jobs proposals, saying the country must continue to "spend our way out of this recession" until more Americans are back at work. Joblessness had soared 6 percent in the final two years of George W. Bush’s presidency - 2009

Today in Media History: Radio stations broadcast the 1936 abdication speech of King Edward VIII

Today in Media History: Radio stations broadcast the 1936 abdication speech of King Edward VIII

Saturday, December 06, 2014

Today in Labor History

African-American delegates meet in Washington, D.C., to form the Colored National Labor Union as a branch of the all-white National Labor Union created three years earlier. Unlike the NLU, the CNLU welcomed members of all races. Isaac Myers was the CNLU's founding president; Frederick Douglas became president in 1872 - 1869
The Washington Monument is completed in Washington, D.C. On the interior of the monument are 193 commemorative stones, donated by numerous governments and organizations from all over the world; one of them is from the Int’l Typographical Union, founded in 1852. In 1986 the ITU merged into the Communications Workers of America - 1884
A total of 361 coal miners die at Monongah, W.Va., in nation's worst mining disaster - 1907
Int’l Glove Workers Union of America merges into Amalgamated Clothing Workers - 1961
United Mine Workers begin what is to become a 110-day national coal strike - 1997

Friday, December 05, 2014

Roots of PROHIBITION The Time is Now



Today in Media History: Front pages and newsreels tell the story of Prohibition’s 1933 repeal

Today in Media History: Front pages and newsreels tell the story of Prohibition’s 1933 repeal

Friday Night in the Blogosphere

The printing presses have been removed from the 
Los Angeles Times Costa Mesa Facility



The Desert Sun is hiring! - Luis Gomez

Tribune Rises in NYSE Debut - Broadcasting Cable

Newspaper Guild takes Time to task - New York Post

Geeks Bearing Gifts: No Mas Mass Media - Jeff Jarvis

Crain’s new website holds ‘open house’ - Robert Feder

Images of protests on front pages and homepages - Poynter

In California news is free; donations welcome! - Editors Weblog

Editors and staff of The New Republic resign en masse - LAObserved

100 Layoffs Happening at OC Register, Riverside P-E - Gustavo Arellano

Michigan newspapers may lose monopoly on legal notices - Talking New Media

Beutner apparently didn't mean to ding LA Times' Biz section - LA Observed

Beutner apparently didn't mean to ding LA Times' Biz section - LA Observed

USA Today kills weekend magazine

USA Today kills weekend magazine

Today in Labor History

Unionists John T. and James B. McNamara are sentenced to 15 years and life, respectively, after confessing to dynamiting the Los Angeles Times building during a drive to unionize the metal trades in the city. They placed the bomb in an alley next to the building, set to detonate when they thought the building would be empty; it went off early, and an unanticipated gas explosion and fire did the real damage, killing twenty people. The newspaper was strongly conservative and anti-union - 1911
Ending a 20-year split, the two largest labor federations in the U.S. merge to form the AFL-CIO, with a membership estimated at 15 million - 1955
AFL-CIO President John Sweeney welcomes the collapse of World Trade Organization talks in Seattle, declaring, "No deal is better than a bad deal." - 1999
The U.S. Department of Labor reports employers slashed 533,000 jobs the month before—the most in 34 years—as the Great Recession surged. The unemployment rolls had risen for seven months before that and were to continue to soar for another 10 months before topping 10 percent and beginning to level off late the following year - 2008
2014.12.01history-hardtimes.bookcover(Some unions and workers continue to struggle as a result of the Great Recession. Union Strategies for Hard Times, Helping Your Members and Building Your Union, 2nd Edition, offers guidance for leaders trying to help laid off members, protect those still working, and prevent the gutting of their hard-fought contracts—and their very unions themselves.)

December 04
President Roosevelt announces the end of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), concluding the four-year run of one of the American government's most ambitious public works programs. It helped create jobs for roughly 8.5 million people during the Great Depression and left a legacy of highways and public buildings, among other public gains - 1943
UAW President Walter Reuther elected president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations - 1952
Cesar Chavez jailed for 20 days for refusing to end United Farm Workers' grape boycott - 1970
December 03
Textile strikers win 10-hour day, Fall River, Mass. - 1866
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passes an ordinance setting an 8-hour workday for all city employees - 1867
IWW union Brotherhood of Timber Workers organized - 1910
2014.12.01history-oakland.gen.strike
Canada’s Quebec Bridge, spanning the St. Lawrence River, opens to traffic on this day after the deaths of 89 construction workers in the course of the job. A flawed design was blamed for a 1907 collapse that killed 75; another 13 died in 1916 when a hoisting device failed as the central span was being lifted - 1919
General strike begins in Oakland, Calif., started by female department store clerks - 1946
The express passenger train "20th Century Limited" ends more than 60 years of service when it takes its last run from New York City to Chicago - 1967
Some 5,000 union construction workers in Oahu, Hawaii, march to City Hall in protest of a proposed construction moratorium by the city council – 1976
At least four thousand people die, and as many as 20,000, in one of the largest industrial disasters on record. It happened in Bhopal, India, when poisonous methyl isocyante was released into the atmosphere at a Union Carbide India Limited pesticide plant. The results of investigations by Union Carbide and the government were never released to the public; one authoritative independent study laid blame at the feet of Union Carbide for its failures on training, staffing, safety and other issues - 1984
2014.12.01history-realworld.bookcover(Real World Labor: Economics, Politics & Social History, 2nd edition: With more than 80 articles by leading writers and scholars of the labor movement, this essential anthology addresses recent changes in the nature of work and wages; discrimination by race, gender, and immigration status; militarism and its effects on the working class; union responses to the global financial meltdown; and new forms of rank-and-file organizing and resistance.)
Arrests began today in Middleton, N.J., of teachers striking in violation of a no-strike law. Ultimately 228 educators were jailed for up to seven days before they were released following the Middleton Township Education Association's agreement to take the dispute to mediation - 2001